Steven Brody, M.D.

Professor
Internal Medicine
Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine

Molecular Cell Biology Program

  • 314-362-8969

  • 314-362-8968, 314-362-8920

  • 314-362-8987

  • 8052

  • CSRB 9938

  • brodys@wustl.edu

  • cilia, development, epithelium, lung, transcription

  • Cell and molecular mechanisms of airway epithelial cell differentiation and cilia biogenesis

Research Abstract:

The focus of our laboratory is abnormalities of the airway epithelial cell differentiation that characterize many lung diseases. We are particularly interested in mechanism of ciliogenesis in airway epithelial cells and primary and motile cilia in other tissues. To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate normal pulmonary epithelial cell growth and differentiation in disease, we are investigating airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation in the developing lung, in a primary culture system of fully differentiated mouse airway epithelial cells that we developed, and lung infection models. We then use this information to determine normal pathways of differentiation and how these altered in disease and infection by respiratory viruses and bacteria.

Our work in ciliogenesis is built around the function of a master ciliogenesis transcription factor called Foxj1. This factor is a member of the forkhead family of transcription factors. We have generated a mouse that is deficient in this gene and found that the mouse has situs inversus and absent ciliogenesis, mimicking the human Kartegener's syndrome and providing key information related to cilia biogenesis. Current genetic analyses are directed toward understanding the regulation of both primary and motile ciliogenesis and their relationships in development, differentiation, injury and repair of lung and other tissues.

Selected Publications:

The focus of our laboratory is abnormalities of the airway epithelial cell differentiation that characterize many lung diseases. We are particularly interested in mechanism of ciliogenesis in airway epithelial cells and primary and motile cilia in other tissues. To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate normal pulmonary epithelial cell growth and differentiation in disease, we are investigating airway epithelial cell growth and differentiation in the developing lung, in a primary culture system of fully differentiated mouse airway epithelial cells that we developed, and lung infection models. We then use this information to determine normal pathways of differentiation and how these altered in disease and infection by respiratory viruses and bacteria.

Our work in ciliogenesis is built around the function of a master ciliogenesis transcription factor called Foxj1. This factor is a member of the forkhead family of transcription factors. We have generated a mouse that is deficient in this gene and found that the mouse has situs inversus and absent ciliogenesis, mimicking the human Kartegener's syndrome and providing key information related to cilia biogenesis. Current genetic analyses are directed toward understanding the regulation of both primary and motile ciliogenesis and their relationships in development, differentiation, injury and repair of lung and other tissues.

Last Updated: 8/3/2011 1:57:50 PM

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