Keiko Hirose, M.D.

Associate Professor
Otolaryngology

Neurosciences Program

  • 314-454-4033

  • 314-747-7272

  • 314-454-2174

  • 2ND FLOOR CID

  • hirosek@ent.wustl.edu

  • inflammation, inner ear, cochlear injury, monocytes, macrophages, blood labyrinth barrier

  • Innate immunity in the inner ear and its influence on inner ear fluid homeostasis and hair cell degeneration

Research Abstract:

My research program focuses on improving our understand of how inflammation affects the inner ear; how this cell population aids or hampers the repair process after cochlear injury. There are numerous processes that induce cochlear inflammation; ranging from meningitis to cochlear surgery. My long term goals are to use an improved understanding of inner ear immunity to devise therapies and strategies for progressive sensorineural hearing loss and to identify methods of preserving residual hearing in individuals who undergo cochlear implantation. By improving our understanding of how innate immunity affects the normal architecture of the cochlea and how fibrosis and scar formation occur in the inner ear; I hope to provide more specific ways to support the survival of hair cells and spiral ganglion cells early during degeneration before hearing loss becomes irreversible.

Mentorship and Commitment to Diversity Statement:
We recognize that race and gender discrimination is found throughout
much of society, and academic and scientific institutions are not exceptions. Racism and sexism must be named and addressed. We identify with and stand with minority communities in demanding equality for all
people, regardless of race, sex, religion or color. It is our civic duty to make
equality, education, opportunity, and personal safety a reality for all.  We are committed to devoting energy to advancing equality and inclusive excellence and
supporting all of our colleagues and students. Each of us must actively listen to appreciate the experience of others who are not like us; change
ourselves; fight indifference, injustice, and institutional and personal prejudice; identify and remove barriers and allow for universal
participation in all the benefits of the free world.

Selected Publications:

Warchol ME, Schwendener RA, Hirose K. Depletion of resident macrophages does not alter sensory regeneration in the avian cochlea. 2012 Plos ONE 7(12): e51574. Doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051574.

Hirose K* and Sato E. Comparative analysis of the effects of combination kanamycin-furosemide versus kanamycin alone in the mouse cochlea. Hearing Research. 2011: 272(1-2):108-16.

Sato E, Shick HE, Ransohoff RM, Hirose K*. Expression of fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 on cochlear macrophages influences survival of hair cells following ototoxic injury. Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology. 2010: 11(2):223-34 .

Hirose K*. Hearing loss and diabetes: you might not know what you’re missing. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2008;149(1):54-5.

Sato E, Shick HE, Ransohoff RM, Hirose K*. Repopulation of cochlear macrophages in murine hematopoietic progenitor cell chimeras: the role of CX3CR1. Journal of Comparative Neurology 2008 506(6):930-942.

Sato E, Shick HE, Ransohoff RM, Hirose K*. Expression of fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 on cochlear macrophages influences survival of hair cells following ototoxic injury. Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology 2010 11(2):223-34 .

Hirose K* and Sato E. Comparative analysis of the effects of combination kanamycin-furosemide versus kanamycin alone in the mouse cochlea. Hearing Research 2011 272(1-2):108-16.

Rowe T, Rizzi M, Hirose K, Peters G, Sen GC. Novel role of the double stranded RNA-binding protein, PACT in mouse ear development and hearing. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 2006 103(15):5823-8.

Sautter NB, Shick HE, Ransohoff RM, Charo IF, Hirose K*. CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is protective against noise-induced hair cell death. Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology 2006 (4):361-72.

Hirose K*, Discolo C, Keasler J, Ransohoff R. Mononuclear phagocytes migrate into the murine cochlea after acoustic trauma. Journal of Comparative Neurology 2005 489:180-194.

Solares CA, Edling AE, Hirose K, Hughes GB, Tuohy VK. Experimental autoimmune hearing loss mediated by CD4+ T cells specific for mouse inner ear peptides. Journal of Clinical Investigation 2004 113:1210-1227.

Last Updated: 3/22/2021 2:28:15 PM

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