Moe Mahjoub, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Internal Medicine
Nephrology
Cell Biology and Physiology

Molecular Cell Biology Program
Developmental, Regenerative and Stem Cell Biology Program
Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology Program

  • 314-362-5681

  • 314-454-5126

  • McDonnell Science Building, Room 880

  • mmahjoub@wustl.edu

  • http://mahjoublab.wustl.edu

  • Cell cytoskeleton, microtubules, cilia, centrosome, cell cycle, signal transduction, kidney/lung development and disease

  • The microtubule cytoskeleton in health and disease

Research Abstract:

The focus of research in my laboratory is to define the functions of the microtubule cytoskeleton, specifically the centrosome and cilium, during mammalian development. These highly conserved cellular organelles act as signaling hubs that regulate various aspects of cell-cycle progression, cell division, differentiation, polarity, and migration. Mutations that disrupt the structure and function of of these key microtubule structures lead to a host of human diseases known collectively as "Ciliopathies". These are congenital and degenerative diseases with multi-organ pathologies, such as Polycystic Kidney Disease, microcephaly, lung disease (COPD, Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia, bronchiectasis), polydactyly, infertility, hydrocephalus and cancer. We use a cell biology approach, combined with cutting-edge imaging and proteomic methods, to study the role of the microtubule cytoskeleton during growth and differentiation of mammalian tissues and organs. We have developed mouse models that recapitulate these human disease phenotypes, and established in vitro primary and stem-cell culture models with which we can study the underlying cell, molecular and developmental mechanisms.

For a more detailed description of our research visit http://mahjoublab.wustl.edu

Selected Publications:

Sahabandu N, Kong D, Magidson V, Nanjundappa R, Sullenberger C, Mahjoub MR, and Loncarek J. (2019). Expansion Microscopy for the Analysis of Centrioles and Cilia. Journal of Microscopy. doi: 10.1111/jmi.12841.

Nanjundappa R, Kong D, Shim K, Stearns T, Brody SL, Loncarek J, and Mahjoub MR. (2019). Regulation of Cilia Abundance in Multiciliated Cells. eLife. pii: e44039. doi: 10.7554/eLife.44039.

Bowler M, Kong D, Sun S, Nanjundappa R, Evans L, Farmer V, Holland A, Mahjoub MR, Sui H, and Loncarek J. (2019). High-resolution Characterization of Centriole Distal Appendage Morphology and Dynamics by Correlative STORM and Electron Microscopy. Nature Communications. Mar 1;10(1):993.

Trott JF, Hwang VJ, Chmiel K, Ishimaru T, Zhou X, Shim K, Stewart B, Mahjoub MR, Jen KY, Barupal D, Li X and Weiss RH. (2018). Arginine reprogramming in ADPKD results in arginine-dependent cystogenesis. American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology. 1;315(6):F1855-F1868.

Wambach J, Wegner DJ, Yang P, Shinawi M, Baldridge D, Betleja E, Shimony JS, Spencer D, Hackett BP, Andrews MV, Ferkol T, Dutcher SK, Mahjoub MR, Cole FS. (2018). Functional Characterization of Biallelic RTTN Variants Identified in an Infant with Microcephaly, Simplified Gyral Pattern, Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia, and Seizures. Pediatric Research. doi: 10.1038/s41390-018-0083-z.

Dionne LK*, Shim K*, Hoshi M, Cheng T, Wang J, Marthiens V, Knoten A, Basto R, Jain S, and Mahjoub MR. (2018). Centrosome Amplification Disrupts Renal Development and Causes Cystogenesis. J. Cell Biology. 2;217(7):2485-2501.

Betleja E, Nanjundappa R, Cheng T, and Mahjoub MR. (2018). A novel Cep120-dependent mechanism inhibits centriole maturation in quiescent cells. eLife. pii: e35439. doi: 10.7554/eLife.35439.

Potter C, Zhu W, Razafsky D, Ruzycki P, Kolesnikov AV, Doggett T, Kefalov VJ, Betleja E, Mahjoub MR and Hodzic D. (2017). Multiple isoforms of Nesprin1 are integral components of ciliary rootlets. Current Biology. 10;27(13):2014-2022.

Hwang VJ, Zhou X, Chen X, Trott J, Abu Aboud O, Shim K, Dionne LK, Senapedis W, Baloglu E, Mahjoub MR, Li X, and Weiss RH (2017). Anti-cystogenic activity of a small molecule PAK4 inhibitor as a novel treatment for ADPKD. Kidney International. 92(4):922-933.

Silva E, Betleja E, John E, Spear P, Moresco JJ, Zhang S, Yates JR 3rd, Mitchell BJ, Mahjoub MR. (2016). Ccdc11 is a novel centriolar satellite protein essential for ciliogenesis and establishment of left-right asymmetry. Mol Biol Cell. 1;27(1):48-63.

Hoshi M, Wang J, Jain S and Mahjoub MR. (2015). Imaging centrosomes and cilia in the mouse kidney. Methods in Cell Biology. 127:1-17.

Mahjoub MR and Stearns T. (2012). Supernumerary centrosomes nucleate extra cilia and compromise primary cilium signaling. Current Biology, 22(17):1628-34.

Park KS, Martelotto LG, Peifer M, Sos ML, Karnezis AN, Mahjoub MR, Bernard K, Conklin J, Szczepny A, Yuan J, Guo R, Ospina B, Falzon J, Bennett S, Brown TJ, Markovic A, Devereux WL, Ocasio CA, Chen JK, Stearns T, Thomas RK, Dorsch M, Buonamici S, Watkins DN, Peacock CD and Sage J. (2011). A crucial requirement for Hedgehog signaling in small cell lung cancer. Nature Medicine, 17(11):1504-8.

Mahjoub MR, Xie Z and Stearns T. (2010). Cep120 is asymmetrically localized to the daughter centriole and is essential for centriole assembly. J Cell Biol. 191(2):331-46.

Last Updated: 1/15/2020 1:29:30 PM

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