Swanne Gordon, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Biology

Evolution, Ecology and Population Biology Program

  • swanne.gordon@wustl.edu

  • https://swannegordon.wordpress.com/

  • The evolution and maintenance of color polymorphisms in warning coloration, rapid evolution, and the interaction between sex linkage and adaptation

Research Abstract:

Swanne Gordon is an evolutionary biologist and behavioral ecologist whose research is built around the underlying question: why is there diversity in nature, and how is it maintained? Her work is interdisciplinary and focuses on the evolution and maintenance of color polymorphisms in warning coloration, rapid evolution, and the interaction between sex linkage and adaptation. To study these topics, she uses a combination of field, laboratory, mathematical, and behavioral experiments. She has two main study systems: the wood tiger moth Arctia plantaginis, and the Trinidadian guppy Poecilia reticulata. Her research is interdisciplinary and involves collaborations with multiple molecular and theoretical biologists. Prior to her appointment at Washington University, Gordon was an Academy of Finland Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Jyväskylä. She earned her doctorate at the University of California, Riverside.

Her research centers on three main areas:
(1) The evolution and maintenance of colour polymorphisms in warning coloration
(2) Rapid evolution
(3) Sex linkage and adaptation.

Selected Publications:

S. P. Gordon, and E. Burdfield-Steel. 2019. Review of ‘Avoiding Attack: The Evolutionary Ecology of Aposematism and Crypsis’ by G. Ruxton et al. Basic and Applied Ecology. 36:54-55.

S. P. Gordon, S. Burdilat, and J. Mappes. 2019. Phenotype-dependent mate choice and the influence of mixed-morph lineage on the reproductive success of a polymorphic and aposematic moth. Evolutionary Ecology. 32:427-441.

Rojas B., E. Burdfield-Steel, C. De Pasqual, S. P. Gordon, L. Hernández, J. Mappes, O. Nokelainen, K. Rönkä, and C. Lindstedt. 2019. Multimodal aposematic signals and their emerging role in mate attraction. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 6:93.

M. Arias, J. Mappes, C. Desbois, S. P. Gordon, M. McClure, M. Elias, O. Nokelainen, and D. Gomez. 2019. Transparency reduces predator detection in mimetic clearwing butterflies. Functional Ecology. DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.13315.

Ronkä K., C. De Pasqual, J. Mappes, S.P. Gordon S.P., and B. Rojas. 2018. Colour alone matters: no predator generalisation among morphs of an aposematic moth. Animal Behaviour, 135:153-163.

Last Updated: 12/15/2019 3:15:44 PM

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